Charles Darwin Beagle Voyage date | Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution by natural selection

Charles Darwin Beagle Voyage date

Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle (1839)

Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle (1890)Darwin@the Library info | Exhibit brochure (pdf)

Which of Darwin’s books was the most popular during his own lifetime?

Charles Darwin’s second book was a travel narrative, a lively account of the Beagle voyage originally published in 1839 as the third volume of the Journal of Researches. The Journal was a 4-volume report of the voyage edited by Robert Fitzroy, captain of H.M.S. Beagle.

Darwin, Journal of Researches (1839), title pageDarwin’s journal became known in subsequent editions simply as the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Darwin’s Voyage was an immediate best-seller. More people read this book in the 19th century than any of Darwin’s other works.

Darwin recounted adventures at sea: sailing around Cape Horn, passing by snow-topped mountains and volcanic islands.

And adventures on land: crossing icy bridges in the Andes and traversing treacherous mountain passages. He relayed visions of strange, far-away places and the exotic people who lived there.

Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle (1890)

Darwin’s travel narrative was widely admired, both in Britain and on the continent, as a description of the scientist as an explorer encountering the exotic and sublime.

The Voyage makes compelling reading, recounting stories about many of the specimens described in the Zoology. For example, the Voyage explains that Darwin caught the vampire bat beautifully colored in the Zoology as it alighted on the back of his horse near Coquimbo, in Chile.

The 1890 edition of the Voyage depicted the Galapagos tortoise, which somehow escaped being described in the Zoology.

It’s no wonder the Voyage of the Beagle has remained in print to this day.




Mary Evans Framed Print of Ceroglossus Beetle from Mary Evans
Home (Mary Evans)
  • FRAMED PRINT This 20 x16 (51x41cm) Framed Print features an image of Ceroglossus Beetle chosen by Mary Evans. Estimated image size 449x406mm.
  • Black Satin with Off-White Digital Mat 20 x16 wooden frame with digital mat and RA4 print. Finished back including brown backing paper, hanging bracket and corner...
  • Image Description Ceroglossus Beetle One of the specimens collected from the Andes of Chile by Charles Darwin during his five year voyage on the HMS Beagle (1831...
  • For any queries regarding this image please contact Mary Evans quoting Reference 8624750
  • Image supplied and selected by Mary Evans. (c) Mary Evans / Natural History Museum

Top home-school texts dismiss Darwin, evolution

by Ed_Blackmail

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Home-school mom Susan Mule wishes she hadn't taken a friend's advice and tried a textbook from a popular Christian publisher for her 10-year-old's biology lessons.
Mule's precocious daughter Elizabeth excels at science and has been studying tarantulas since she was 5. But she watched Elizabeth's excitement turn to confusion when they reached the evolution section of the book from Apologia Educational Ministries, which disputed Charles Darwin's theory.
"I thought she was going to have a coronary," Mule said of her daughter, who is now 16 and taking college courses in Houston

Bird brainiacs: The genius of pigeons  — New Scientist
Before a visit from his friend the geologist Charles Lyell, Darwin wrote: "I will show you my pigeons! Which is the greatest treat, in my opinion, which ..

Mary Evans Photo Jigsaw Puzzle of Ceroglossus Beetle from Mary Evans
Home (Mary Evans)
  • PHOTO JIGSAW PUZZLE This Photo Puzzle features a cropped image of Ceroglossus Beetle chosen by Mary Evans. Estimated image size 356x254mm.
  • 10x14 Photo Puzzle with 252 pieces. Packed in black cardboard box of dimensions 5 5/8 x 7 5/8 x 1 1/5. Puzzle image 5x7 affixed to box top. Puzzle pieces printed...
  • Image Description Ceroglossus Beetle One of the specimens collected from the Andes of Chile by Charles Darwin during his five year voyage on the HMS Beagle (1831...
  • For any queries regarding this image please contact Mary Evans quoting Reference 8624750
  • Image supplied and selected by Mary Evans. (c) Mary Evans / Natural History Museum
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